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ESL Pronunciation English Vowel Trivia

Most of these observations are necessary for completeness but do not affect comprehension.

Roving Schwa

If the letter is textless, it is generally safe to use schwa. Most words beginning with a use a schwa as a separate syllable, including the word “a” itself; and many suffixes routinely use schwa, such as: -a, -ain, -ance, -ant, -ence, -ent, -eon, -ful, -ic, -ion, -ive, -less, -ment, -ness, -ous, -ship (note that these are all considered short (closed) syllables even if they end in a silent E). A short list of typical schwa words with a capital vowel, including: abbOt, ballAd, bAnanA, biAs, biscUIt, burEAUcrat, circUIt, circUs, collegIAte, cOllide, colOny, cOnnect, famOUs, fashionllahans, g respect, afternoon, sea, mountain, hill, happened, ocean, doctor, misfortune, shopping, goal, rabbit, fast, saturday, salAd, silence, ticket, valid, etc.

The Many Faces of U

As mentioned before, the most common vowel sounds are classical, short and long; and we learned about the silent E. We should also consider some other rules related to U.

Silent U appears in most words that contain “gue” or “gui”, and in words like biscuit, circuit, guarantee, guard, attractive, lacquer, languor, liquor, plaque, pursuer, quay, and vanguard. The function of the silent U is to indicate that G has the hard “g” sound, not “dzh” (or that C has the hard “k” sound, not “s”). An option is “argue”, pronounced as it appears (“argyoo”).

U makes the semivowel “w” sound in many words, most commonly those containing “gua” and “qu,” as well as words like eat, suite, and tuille.

U also says his name (“yoo”) in several words, such as those starting with u- one syllable, those with -ual, -ule, -uous (“yoo-uhss”), -ure, or. -like roots and words like the following: blame, argue, botulism, bureau, blind, cube, cucumber (“kyoo-kuhmberr”), cuke, cube, formula, fuel, rage, hubris, hue, big, man, humble, funny , mural, banana, music, pubic, puke, pule, doll, simulate, spatula, virtue, etc.

European voters

Many of the vowels listed here are more commonly listed in the International Phonetic Alphabet. Two other pronunciations each for OE and UE are common in French and German, and are reflected in borrowings from these languages ​​into English (they are also represented by O and U with umlauts). Generally, these vowels can be ignored in learning English if one is not already familiar with them.

Syllabic Consonants

The consonant sounds “l”, “m”, “n”, and “ng” can all be preceded by a clipped schwa, which gives them the quality of a vowel. Usually the schwa appears as some vowel. Most words ending in -AL are pronounced “uhl” with this shorter schwa. Most words ending in a consonant followed by -LE are also pronounced “uhl”; the most common ambiguities are -BE and -IBLE (“uhbuhl”, “ihbuhl”). In these cases the E is silent and the L has an unwritten schwa vowel. Some names and words like dirndl also have the typical letter L.

Endless consonants ending in a vowel followed by an “m” or “n” sound also have this schwa quality; occurrence of “ng” is limited to very fast speech. Words ending in SM take a schwa and are pronounced “-zuhm”: khasm, prism, sarcasm, spasm and all words ending in -ism. As a final point of trivia, the three-syllable word massacre replaces the E with ING in a comma, gets an extra bold but not an extra vowel, creating a unique pronounced R: massacre is “maassuhkerrihng.”

Rare words

Other rare combinations are often found without links; that is, they are compound words where two consecutive letters belong to different parts of the word and should be kept separately and not combined. Watch out for unrelated vowels even in common pairs. A few combinations that when connected make different combinations are:

AA is usually “ah” (not “aa”), as in aargh, baa, bazaar, laager, salaam.

AO is usually “ah-oo”, as in cacao, ciao, miaow, prao, tao.

EH is usually “ey”, as in almeh, feh, heh, mikveh, tempeh.

UH is usually “yoo”, as in buhl, buhr, fuhrer, muhly, uhlan.

UO is usually “ah”, as in buoy, fluor, languor, quattuordecillion, sonobuoy.

EAU is usually “oh”, as in beaux, bureau, chateaux, eau, tablo.

IEU is usually “yoo”, as in adieu, lieu, lieutenant, miieu, priedieu.

(IH, II, IU, IW, IY, and UW are all usually unrelated.)

Single words give great power to a person’s vocabulary. The following words are rare exceptions to the normal sounds of letter combinations. They are good at looking through dictionaries and showing their vocabulary and pronunciation skills:

AA as “ey” in quaalude

AE as “ee” in eon

AE as “eh” in aesthetics.

AO as “ey” in prison

AO in Pharaoh as “oh”.

AU as “ey” in scale

AU as “oh” in chauvinist

AY as “aee” in aye, bayou, papaya, etc.

EA as “ey” in between, big, steak, etc.

EA as “ih” indeed

EAU as “yoo” in beauty.

EE as “ey” in matinee

EI as “aee” in height, heist

EO as “eh” in danger, leopard

EO in yeoman as “oh”.

EU as “yoo” in feod

IT’S like “yoo” in a little, hew, mew

EY as “aee” in geyser

IA in diamond as “aee”.

IA as “ih” in burden, marriage

IE like “ey” in lingerie

IE as “ih” in shade

IH as “ee” in ihram, mihrab, shantih.

II as “ee” in aalii, shiitake

OE as “ee” in phoebe

OI as “ee” in chamois

OI as “waee” in chorus.

OI in patois as “wah”.

OO in brooch as “oh”.

OO like “uh” in blood, flood

OU as “oh” in rock, mold, soul, etc.

OU as “w” in bivouac, ouabain

OUW as “ah-oo” in vrouw

OY in coyote as “aee”.

UH as in “uh” in huh

UI like “uh” in sluice

UU as “oo” in muumuu, void

UY as “ee” in cliquy, guyot, plaguy.

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