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What Are Perfumes?

According to Wikipedia “Perfume is a mixture of aromatic essential oils and aromatic compounds, fixatives and solvents used to give a pleasant fragrance to the human body, objects and living spaces”. The word “perfume” comes from the Latin “per fume”, which means to smoke.

The art of making perfumes (perfumery) started in ancient Egypt and was later developed by the Romans and the Arabs. The process of extracting flower oils by distillation was started by an Iranian doctor named Avicenna. This is the most used process today. The first modern perfume, made from aromatic oils mixed in an alcohol solution, was created in Hungry in 1370 and became known throughout Europe as Hungarian Water. Perfumery continued to develop in Renaissance Italy and from the 16th century in France. Floriculture for aromatic plants grew into a large industry in the south of France. Today, France remains the center of European perfume design and trade.

The exact formulas of the perfumes are kept secret by the design houses. However, some aroma experts can identify the composition and origin of aromas in the same way as Wine Testers.

Aroma classifications

In general, perfumes can be classified according to their concentration level and scent notes. Essential oils are usually diluted with ethanol or a mixture of ethanol and water, as their volatility can cause allergic reactions or damage to skin and clothing.

Here is the fragrance collection level chart:

Pure perfume: 20 – 40% aromatic oils

Eau De Parfum: 10 – 30% perfume oils

Eau De Toilette: 5 – 20% perfume oils

Eau De Cologne: 2 – 5% perfume oils

Perfume houses specify different concentration levels for the same fragrance category.

Eau De Toilette from one house may be stronger than Eau De Parfum from another house.

There are three different classifications of perfumes according to their scents: traditional, created around 1900, modern, since 1945, and thus the Perfume wheel created in 1983.

The perfume wheel is widely used in the retail and perfume industry today. There are five standard categories: Floral, Oriental, Woody, Fresh, and Fougere (with the Fougere family at the center of this cycle because it usually contains aromatic elements from all four other families).

Perfumes are described in three notes: top, middle and base. The notes unfold over time, with the immediate impact of the top notes, then the deeper middle notes and finally the base notes slowly appearing as the final stage. These notes are very carefully selected with knowledge of the perfume evaporation process. The above signs are immediately understood upon application of the perfume and therefore, they are very important in the sale of the perfume. The middle and base notes together are the main theme of the perfume.

Essential oil sources.

Bark: Commonly used berries are cinnamon and cascarilla as well as sassafras root bark.

Flowers and flowers: These are the largest source of aromatic oils. Rose, jasmine, osmanthus, mimosa, tuberose and the flowers of citrus trees and ylang-ylang are commonly used in the perfume industry.

Fruit: Fresh fruits such as apples, strawberries and cherries do not smell good and are usually obtained synthetically. Exceptions include litsea cubeba, vanilla, and juniper berry, and the most commonly used oranges, limes, and grapefruit.

Leaves and branches: Lavender, patchouli, sage, violet, rosemary, and citrus leaves are commonly used.

Resin: Resins commonly used in perfumery include labdanum, frankincense, myrrh, balsam of Peru, benzoin, as well as pine and frankincense.

Roots, rhizomes and flowers: Iris rhizomes, vetiver roots are often used for perfumes.

Seed: Tonka bean, coriander, caraway, nutmeg, mace, cardamom and anise.

Tree: It is very important in finding basic notes. Commonly used woods include sandalwood, rosewood, agarwood, birch, cedar, juniper and pine.

Ambergris: It is commonly called “amber” from Sperm Whale.

Castoreum: It is obtained from the fragrant bags of North American seaweed.

Society: It is obtained from the fragrant pouches of civets (mongoose family).

Honey bee tree: Honey is distilled from honey.

Musk: Originally derived from the scented musk sacs of Asian musk deer, they have now been replaced by synthetic musk.

Lichen: Lichen is a type of fungus that grows in large nests on trees and rocks. Commonly used mosses are moss and wood moss.

Protesters: Seaweed is often used as an essential oil in perfumes.

Synthetic sources: Made by organic synthesis from petroleum distillates or pine resins. They can provide aromas that cannot be found in nature. Synthetic fragrances are often used as an alternative source of compounds that cannot be easily obtained from natural sources. Typical examples include musk, orchid scents, linalool and coumarin.

Fragrance oils usually contain tens to hundreds of ingredients. Modern perfumes and colognes are made with aromatic oils produced by perfume houses. The perfume oils are then mixed with ethyl alcohol and water for at least 14 days and filtered to remove unwanted particles and then filled into perfume bottles.

In recent years, celebrities have signed contracts with perfume houses to put their names on perfumes as a self-branding campaign. Some famous perfumes include Antonio Banderas (Spirit), David Beckham (Instinct), Celine Dion (Celine Dion Notes, Celine Dion Belong), Paris Hilton (Paris Hilton, Just Me Paris Hilton), Jennifer Lopez (JLo). Glow, Still, Miami Glow, Love At First Glow), Britney Spears (Fantasy, In Control, In Control Curious), Elizabeth Taylor (Passion, White Diamonds, Forever Elizabeth), Maria Sharapova (Maria Sharapova) and many more.

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